r/worldnews Oct 20 '21 Silver 27 Helpful 26 Wholesome 28 Hugz 31 All-Seeing Upvote 3 Bless Up 1

New archaeological find proves that vikings were in North America by 1021 CE, roughly 500 years before Christopher Columbus

https://arstechnica.com/science/2021/10/vikings-were-in-north-america-by-1021-ce/
92.7k Upvotes

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u/Owl55 Oct 21 '21 Silver Helpful Wholesome Hugz

It’s been a thousand years since the Vikings got here and they still haven’t won a super bowl.

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u/Omgbrownies_ Oct 21 '21

Oh come on, I wasn’t depressed about this yet today

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u/TheGhostofCipher Oct 20 '21

I wonder if there any alternate world stories if vikings fully colonized america?

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u/Keanman Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

In the same writings of Leif Erikson, he describes going to more than just Vinland. The Vikings also visited "Markland" and a third location that the name escapes me (Helluland - thanks jackp0t789!) that were considered settlements.

Edit: corrected spelling and added third location name.

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u/DumbThoth Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 22 '21 Silver Helpful Wholesome Hugz Starry Narwhal Salute

A study back in 2019 says that the area could have been inhabited for around a century

I live in Newfoundland and have spent ages at the site and even wrote a focus paper on this a couple years ago looking at modern archeology and how for the most part it confirms W.A.Munn's speculations on the locations of the sagas and extent to which the norse settled in reference to the stories from the "Saga of the Greenlander" and the saga of "Eric the Red". He mades these speculations over a century ago.

He speculated Pistolet bay would be where we would find a settlement before the discovery of L'anse aux Meadows by the Ingstads which confirmed it 50 years later.

He also speculated Baffin Island would have been the Helluland of the Sagas a century before Patricia Sutherland Discovered what is likely a longhouse there. Unfortunately funding for that excavation was cut so the government could put some effort towards finding the HMS Erebus.

W.A. Munn also speculated later exploration would have been around the sop's arm area and indeed just under a century later a paper was published detailing the fact that hunting pits in the norse style have been found there . The Ingstads also visited these pits and found them compelling.

He also thinks Markland - Where the Norsemen would have gotten their timber was Labrador.

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u/Totalwarhelp Oct 20 '21

Great comment dude, under appreciated, I went on a Viking binge of nonfiction books this year and the sagas are so fascinating.

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u/John_T_Conover Oct 21 '21

I love learning about this stuff and find it so sad and frustrating at the same time. There are probably so many amazing discoveries, adventures and major historical milestones that were accomplished by some of the Viking & Pacific Islander explorers that are just forever lost to time. Many whose names we'll never even know.

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u/Totalwarhelp Oct 21 '21

Vikings to me are probably the most fascinating culture and completely misrepresented in modern media.

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u/Smarf_Starkgaryen Oct 21 '21

Any books you recommend? Never read about it but I’m curious!

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u/IPostWhenIWant Oct 21 '21

Not OP, but I have a couple for ya. The Sagas of the Icelanders and The Sea Wolves (make sure to pluralize wolf there or you get a very different book that is 100000% recommended)

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u/moneyeagle Oct 21 '21

Vikings are probably the biggest exception to 'winners write history'

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u/Natural_Sad Oct 21 '21

I was reading pre-Colombus contact evidence and when the Portuguese showed up in I think Java they found a map that showed asian navigators had already found the west Coast of America.

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u/John_T_Conover Oct 21 '21

I'm intrigued though very doubtful. There does seem to be some pretty strong evidence of contact between some Pacific Islanders (Hawaiian's I believe?) and the west coast. Very similar or exact same words for items even though they are completely unrelated languages. Also the importing of sweet potatoes native to the Americas hundreds of years before Columbus:

https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2013/01/22/169980441/how-the-sweet-potato-crossed-the-pacific-before-columbus

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u/warpus Oct 20 '21

I think reddit garbled your links, I think it's to do with the brackets

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u/BusterBoPeep Oct 20 '21

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u/Sanctimonius Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21 Silver

Always thought it was crazy a viking gave it such a French name.

Edit: I feel like there's a few missing it, so I'll put in this /s

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u/jackp0t789 Oct 20 '21

and a third location that the name escapes me that were considered settlements.

Helluland

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u/xeviphract Oct 20 '21

Thanks. All I could think of was "Slab Land!"

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u/iVikingr Oct 20 '21

For anyone curious, there is a statue of him in downtown Reykjavík, Iceland. It was a gift from the United States to the people of Iceland on the 1,000 year anniversary of the Icelandic parliament in 1930.

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u/kdk3090 Oct 20 '21

Vinland is current day Newfoundland. They were chased out of their settlement by the local Native population, iirc.

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u/Zodiacrmii Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

One of the prevalent theories is that while establishing a relationship with the Migmaw (apologies for the spelling) community the Norsemen attempted to seal a "peace pact" by all parties drinking from a communal bowl of goat's milk.

Unfortunately something like 80-90% of the Indigenous population were/are locatose intolerant; this would have led to the Migmaw thinking they had been poisoned (when they started having cramps/diarhea hours after the meeting). From there it is a logical leap to a war party attacking Lance-aux-Meadows necessitating abandonment of the young settlement.

Edit: my tired brain transposed Migmaw for Beothuk, my apologies. The Migmaw were brought in to Beothuk territory by yt settlers to eliminate the Beothuk during european colonization.

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u/8BitVic Oct 20 '21

That would actually make a lot of sense and if true is really an unfortunate turn of events.

North America would look quite differently if the Norse had been able to establish permanent settlements with constant trade and transport between North America and Europe 1,000 years ago.

Now I really want to see that timeline..

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u/Methuga Oct 20 '21

Would’ve been kinda hilarious if the English show up to New England in the 1600s, 600 years and 4,500 miles removed from the Vikings completely dominating their way of life, only to see a whole bunch of Natives with Viking culture, clothes and weapons. They’d prolly crap themselves lol

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u/jurgy94 Oct 21 '21

I'm thinking a bit less fictitious: What if the natives contracted and spread the European diseases back then. Allowing them to develop an immunity and repopulate in the about 6-700 years before the Spanish show up. It would probably have changed the course of history in a major way.

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u/UnorignalUser Oct 21 '21

The Portuguese make it to china only to find chinese vikings.

This is fiction story that must be written.

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u/TheOneTrueRodd Oct 21 '21

China was a bustling empire before the Vikings started raiding. Around 800 AD China was going through a golden age. Asian culture has maintained continuity for a long time.

There's a lot of history between the west and east before the age of discovery. It's quite funny reading about how the Romans were complaining about their women spending so much on Indian pearls, it was causing a serious trade deficit. Then there's the ancient Chinese pandemic.

Direct trade links between the Mediterranean lands and India had been established in the late 2nd century BC by the Hellenistic Ptolemaic Kingdom of Egypt. Greek navigators learned to use the regular pattern of the monsoon winds for their trade voyages in the Indian Ocean. The lively sea trade in Roman times is confirmed by the excavation of large deposits of Roman coins along much of the coast of India. Many trading ports with links to Roman communities have been identified in India and Sri Lanka along the route used by the Roman mission. Archaeological evidence stretching from the Red Sea ports of Roman Egypt to India suggests that Roman commercial activity in the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia declined heavily with the Antonine Plague of 166 AD, the same year as the first Roman embassy to Han China, where similar plague outbreaks had occurred from 151 AD.

Pretty crazy when you look back lol.

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u/RedTuesdayMusic Oct 20 '21

Lief

Leif

Vineland

Vinland (wine land)

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u/veritastroof Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

Not wine but grapevine which of course yields grapes (or actually likely some sort of grape-like berry perhaps black currants or something similar) to make wine but otherwise you’re right.

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u/baelrog Oct 20 '21

I would imagine with the stunt he pulled with Greenland, he probably couldn't get enough settlers to believe him that it is indeed a land with berry bearing vines.

I read somewhere it's not exactly grapes, but a general term for plants with edible berries.

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u/fiendishrabbit Oct 20 '21

He's most likely talking about Ribes americanum, aka american blackcurrant, which can be used to make wine and is still common in Canada. The vikings were very familiar with making wine from these kind of berries (even today they're called "vinbär", wineberries, in swedish) and unlike the currants that the vikings were used to the american variety has no thorns. So harvesting is a lot easier.

Although today we would probably call it blackcurrant mead, since the only source of sugar would have been honey.

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u/HobbiesJay Oct 20 '21

Can only imagine you go to a new place and it provides your source of booze as easily as possible compared to the one at home that comes with tiny daggers. Can't help but imagine what the world would look like if the person that made that revelation was more like Leif and not like Columbus.

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u/fiendishrabbit Oct 20 '21

Leif though was hardly a saint.

He named it Vinland because he wanted to start a new colony (or even a kingdom) with himself as the chieftain/petty king.

Pretty much the same reason why Greenland isn't named "Barely livable island". Though Greenland was actually slightly hotter when Erik the Red discovered it compared to today (especially the SE coast where his settlements lay) it was still less hospitable than iceland and reykavik which he had left.

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u/yournorthernbuddy Oct 21 '21

*was exiled from

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u/SlowMoFoSho Oct 20 '21

It's still controversial, but there is some evidence to suggest that he went south as far as NB/NS/PEI and maybe even New England, but that's more conjecture. They've found seeds and nuts at L’Anse aux Meadows that suggest they explored much further south but it hasn't been corroborated by evidence in the places themselves and we'll never likely get it at this point.

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u/crossdrubicon Oct 20 '21

Could those seeds be from trade with other people who travelled from the south?

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u/ZoomBoingDing Oct 20 '21 Silver Gold Wholesome Hugz All-Seeing Upvote Narwhal Salute Table Slap

It's the same United States but every state is Minnesota

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u/CurtLablue Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

Hotdish for everyone!!!

*also all children would play duck duck grey duck and say ope as they did.

Also bringing awareness to this amazing piece of Minnesota history. https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/hjemkomst-viking-ship

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u/SandyDelights Oct 20 '21

Is… Is hotdish not common everywhere…?

I mean, I grew up in SoFla, but my mother’s from Minnesota, so we had hotdish a lot.

And now I’m wondering why I’ve literally never seen any of my friends make hotdishes except for like, “I’m sorry your loved one died a sudden and terrible death, please take this hotdish so that you don’t have to cook for the next week.”

…Thanks for the existential crisis.

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u/Naughtyculturist Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 21 '21

Explain this hot dish of which you speak. Your northern ways intrigue me.

Edit: you guys sure do LOVE your hot dish and tater tots, huh?

never has reddit come together to answer one of my questions so thoroughly and with such close agreement.

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u/SoGruntled Oct 20 '21

I'm not from the north, but my hot dish experience in Minneapolis was a casserole dish filled with chicken pot pie ingredients, minus the crust, so, chicken, gravy, vegetables. But then the magic happens. It is covered in tater tots and baked until lightly crispy on top.

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u/GoldPenis Oct 20 '21

"It's the tots that make it fancy" my Nanmamagrana used to say!

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u/imawakened Oct 20 '21

I’m still trying to figure out how one would pronounce “Nanmamagrana”

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u/ryrypizza Oct 20 '21

Maybe it rhymes with "bad mamajama"?

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u/Heartlanta Oct 21 '21 Helpful

Woah black Betty

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u/PhreakBert Oct 21 '21

Just as fine as she can be.

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u/thoriginal Oct 20 '21

Like "bad mama jamma"

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u/GodlessThoughts Oct 20 '21

Tater tot hotdish. Hotdish is literally just casserole. The terms are interchangable.

Source: I am from MN

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u/Sweetness27 Oct 20 '21

I just realized I have no idea what a casserole is because that's not even close to what I'm used to thinking of them as.

Sounds more like a shepherds pie.

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u/ghoulthebraineater Oct 20 '21

Shepherd's pie would be a casserole.

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u/Sweetness27 Oct 20 '21

Well fuck me.

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u/BGAL7090 Oct 20 '21

Hear me out - would Detroit style pizza count as a casserole?

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u/TwiceCookedPorkins Oct 20 '21

I guess but we hardly know each other.

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u/whisky_decision Oct 20 '21

I was pretty close to today years old when someone rudely corrected me that shepherd's pie is lamb and cottage pie is ground beef.

Okay, well...my mamaw and her wooden spoon would like a word. And yes, it's totally a casserole.

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u/MidnightSlinks Oct 20 '21

Casserole is just any savory dish that's a bunch of ingredients baked together in a big glass dish, usually with some sort of carb- or cheese-based top, but never any type of crust on the bottom.

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u/MentallyOffGrid Oct 20 '21

I’ve got a military buddy I’ve deployed with three times that every time someone gets called an A$$hole he screams, “casserole? I love casserole!”

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u/Katapotomus Oct 20 '21

It can be a metal dish too but glass is the usual

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u/WangusRex Oct 20 '21

This is the way. Except my family uses ground beef.

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u/imeanjustsayin Oct 20 '21

It’s what they call a “casserole”. Exact same thing, different words.

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u/Obi_Sirius Oct 20 '21

Well that's a relief. My mother is Norwegian and I had no F idea what a hotdish was. Casseroles I know all too well.

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u/frugalerthingsinlife Oct 20 '21

In Canada, we have casserole on every day that ends in a Y.

Except Taco Tuesdays. That day is holy.

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u/codefyre Oct 20 '21

Is there no Taco Casserole in Canada?

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u/dr-eval2 Oct 20 '21 Bless Up

There is now!

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u/Bisontracks Oct 20 '21

Yeah, but tacos are sacred. You can enjoy the flavour of taco via the casserole, but if you have a Taco Tuesday, it's gotta be Tacos on Tuesday.

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u/_Kay_Tee_ Oct 20 '21

Non-MNs/midwesterners call it "a casserole." I can remember my Nebraskan relatives using the words "hot dish" to mean a specific baking dish that you would serve a casserole in, but not for the contents of said hot dish.

Clearly it's time for a Reddit potluck!

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u/CaniborrowaThrillho Oct 20 '21

I'll bring the Frito pie with Wolf brand chili

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u/AllOfTheDerp Oct 20 '21

From NE Ohio and the first time I ever heard of hotdish was like 6 months ago on reddit. Went through a similar thing when I went to school in central Indiana and asked my friends from the area if there was a place to get good pierogies during lent and they looked at me like I had three heads. Then one from Chicago who had gone there a year already was like no man, there aren't any polish Catholics here.

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u/bucki_fan Oct 20 '21

As a central Ohioan married to a good polish-Catholic Cleveland girl, you have my pity.

Good pierogi's are God food

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u/MissGruntled Oct 20 '21

I just googled it. Is it not just generic casserole?

Hotdish is an anything goes one-dish meal from the Upper Midwest, but it's especially beloved in Minnesota and North Dakota. A creamy sauce binds three essential hotdish components together: starch, protein, and vegetable.

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u/datboiofculture Oct 20 '21

They make it with tater tots though.

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u/LyingForTruth Oct 20 '21

Tater tot hot dish is king imo, we eat it in Maryland too

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u/FoolhardyBastard Oct 20 '21

My grandma used to make Chow Mein hotdish.. She was a St. Paul native. Nothing is better in my opinion. It's essentially tater tot hotdish but with rice and toped with crunchy Chow Mein noodles. Very ethnic for MN.

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u/CurtLablue Oct 20 '21

A funeral isn't a funeral unless someone is bringing the hot dish and church coffee.

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u/Deevilknievel Oct 20 '21

Nothing like shoveling food/snow before digging a grave.

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u/DeniroDinero Oct 20 '21

That’s one starch option, lots of variations with noodles or rice, cream of this, mixed veggie that and ground beef etc. All good!

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u/EidolonHue Oct 20 '21

So hotdish is as generic as the name sounds, literally any hot dish counts

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u/FitsMcGee Oct 20 '21

Minnesotans were the first to discover hot food in 1972

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u/dweeb_plus_plus Oct 20 '21

I don’t have the energy to look this up so I’ll just assume you’re right.

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u/FooBeeps Oct 20 '21

The creamy sauce is almost ALWAYS cream of Mushroom soup

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u/Seamonkey79 Oct 20 '21

It is, they just like to think it's special in some way since they have to deal with hugging Wisconsin all of the time.

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u/theygonnabanmeagain Oct 20 '21

Sounds like generic casserole to me.

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u/Disembodied_Head Oct 20 '21

In the South there are grief casseroles for times like that.

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u/HeyKidsImmaComputa Oct 20 '21 Take My Energy

How would that work in the NFL? 32 teams but nobody wins the Super Bowl?

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u/ScHoolboy_QQ Oct 20 '21 Silver

Tell me you’re from Wisconsin without telling me you’re from Wisconsin

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u/BigPackHater Oct 20 '21 Helpful

The entire country kicks wide left.

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u/kent_nova Oct 20 '21

Full of sports teams that bring nothing but sadness forlorn hope?

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u/higgscribe Oct 20 '21 Wholesome

Well everyone knows Minnesotans are budget Canadians

Vinland sounds way cooler than United States

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u/Entbriham_Lincoln Oct 20 '21

Accurate, I usually say Minnesota is just Canada Lite

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u/TommenBrady Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

That doesn’t sound terrible. Can the Scots have colonized the rest of Canada in this timeline? I love Nova Scotia and Newfoundland

Edit: turns out Newfies are mostly of Irish descent. Anti-Anglo Gaelic-Nordic team up??

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u/ATN90 Oct 20 '21

Whole of Canada speaking Newfie?

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u/MissGruntled Oct 20 '21

Yes b’y! Loves it!

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u/TommenBrady Oct 20 '21

It would be so chaotic and fun

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u/ATN90 Oct 20 '21

Knows, Tommy, knows.

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u/ClothDiaperAddicts Oct 20 '21

And it would make French about as useful as tits on a bull?

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u/formercrayon Oct 20 '21

my boyfriend is Swedish and I'm native American and we both live in Minnesota. I think this is as close as we can get tbh

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u/Disaster_Capitalist Oct 20 '21

Civilizations by Laurent Binet starts with premise that Vikings made it all the way to South America. https://books.google.com/books/about/Civilisations.html?id=0Y_oDwAAQBAJ

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u/pppjurac Oct 20 '21

Something Harry Turtledowe would write.

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u/RoboFeanor Oct 20 '21

Season 3 episode 9 of Legends of Tomorrow

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u/TheDesktopNinja Oct 20 '21

Hail Beebo!

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u/redbirdrising Oct 20 '21

Not quite the same but in the sci fi book “Fire Upon The Deep”, a group of Norwegians were able to get beyond the solar system and colonized planets. So in effect Viking descendants were the dominant space faring humans.

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u/wiliani Oct 20 '21

I had an idea for a tv series or book series about this where the Vikings’ colony was successful and with the natives lived peacefully and working together, sharing cultures & technologies. They keep the new world a secret from the rest of Europe for as long as possible, including sabotaging Columbus before he left. Capturing/killing/assimilating explorers as they arrive on the shores. This delays Europe “discovering” the new world. The knowledge of the new world finally reaches across the ocean but the new world and Europe are technological equals and both in the early stages of industrialization.

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u/euph_22 Oct 20 '21

I know "reading the article" is passe, but can people atleast read the subtitle. The discovery here is not that the colony existed, it's that they were able to refine the date that it happened (by definitively establishing that the site was established before 1021ce).

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u/Redshifted_Reality Oct 20 '21 Helpful

This is reddit, where we only post jokes based on headlines and also four paragraph long anecdotes about a personal experience

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u/everyone_is_a_robot Oct 20 '21

Unless it's some expert explanation, by some basement dude that just read an Wikipedia article about the topic.

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u/bellends Oct 21 '21

With my limited-but-nonzero knowledge of radiocarbon dating (I’m a physicist, not an archeologist), I read 1021 and thought “ah, they must have established it was roughly 1000 years ago from today, which is why they’re saying 1021 specifically — I bet there are some weird error bars”. But by reading the article turned out that it’s SO MUCH BETTER than that!

Radiocarbon dating of charcoal from L’Anse aux Meadows suggests that the Viking Age came to American shores sometime between 975 and 1020 CE. To narrow down when the Norse arrived in Newfoundland, University of Groningen chronologists Michael Dee and Margot Kuitems, along with their colleagues, looked for evidence of the year a solar storm bombarded Earth’s atmosphere with radiation.

In late 992 and early 993 CE, people in Korea, Germany, and Ireland all mentioned vibrant red auroras dancing in the night sky. Trees around the world trapped an unusually high amount of carbon-14 in their growth rings the following year. Carbon-14 forms in the upper atmosphere when highly energized particles called cosmic rays collide with nitrogen molecules. Usually, those cosmic rays come from events outside our Solar System, toward the center of the Milky Way galaxy, but physicists blame the 993 CE event on our own Sun.

Dendrochronologists (scientists who measure and date tree rings) discovered the carbon-14 spike and dated it to 993 CE in trees from sites around the world. Dee, Kuitems, and their colleagues recently used it as a landmark to help pinpoint the age of three wood fragments from L’Anse aux Meadows.

The fragments, which come from three different trees (a mixture of juniper and fir), were cast-off cuts of wood discarded by the Norse, but all still bear cut marks from iron tools. “We imagine they were refuse from construction projects or indeed just the clearance of land,” Dee told Ars.

All three wood fragments included at least part of a tree’s outermost ring (tree-ring enthusiasts call this the "waney layer"). That confirmed the fragments came from felled trees, not driftwood, whose bark would have been stripped away by the ocean. It also meant that Dee, Kuitems, and their colleagues could date the exact year the trees were cut down.

TIL!

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u/Hey_look_new Oct 20 '21 Helpful Hugz

is this not common knowledge?

I feel like we've known this for many decades

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u/euph_22 Oct 20 '21 Helpful Wholesome Hugz All-Seeing Upvote Helpful (Pro)

They were able to refine the exact date of the settlement. The news here isn't that it happened, it's that they can pin down the settlement to the year 1021ce (rather than somewhere from 900-1100ce).

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u/YMGenesis Oct 20 '21

Great! I was wondering the same

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u/zyzomise Oct 20 '21

Kinda neat that they discover that 1000 years after the fact.

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u/jameye11 Oct 20 '21

Just another way to show that science always betters itself

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u/daskrip Oct 20 '21 Hugz

Also neat that science and tech seems to make the past ever more certain while making the future ever less certain.

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u/Aceofspades25 Oct 20 '21

The fact that they pinpointed an exact year from 3 pieces of wood is mind blowing.

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u/BradburyMan Oct 20 '21

Good old Carbon-14.

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u/TirayShell Oct 20 '21

Just before Valentine's Day.

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u/mathmanmathman Oct 20 '21 Wholesome

Oh god, it's always awkward when you start a new colony just before Valentine's Day.

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u/BlackChickenMagician Oct 20 '21

To gift or not gift. Do you even like the new colony that much?

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u/Setisthename Oct 20 '21

It was known that they settled there, but now there is greater radiocarbon evidence to narrow down when exactly the settlement was active.

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u/g0ris Oct 20 '21

do we know what happened to that settlement?

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u/0resistance_OBEY Oct 21 '21

The comment about not eating fish is bunk. Seriously, vikings who don't eat fish? Get outta here.

It's more likely that they either went back home or assimilated into the native population. Or some combination of both.

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u/SomeNorwegianChick Oct 20 '21

We (Norwegians) were taught this in school.

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u/GrootThereItIs Oct 20 '21

Us Canadians were too. I'm pretty sure we were told they landed in what is now Newfoundland

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u/veerKg_CSS_Geologist Oct 20 '21

Should be Oldfoundland, amiright?

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u/TheRealStorey Oct 20 '21

They confirmed Vikings in North America in the 60's and suspected it much earlier, the Danes wrote of a Viking settlement called "Vinland" in the 12th century, just after this confirmed date.
L'Anse aux Meadows is the confirmed site dating to the same period.
I wonder if they ever carbon-dated any of the wooden artifacts.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L%27Anse\_aux\_Meadows

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u/twoerd Oct 20 '21

I wonder if they ever carbon-dated any of the wooden artifacts.

That’s exactly what this article is talking about, actually. Refined carbon dating techniques combined with knowledge of how unusual solar activity in 993 allowed them to pinpoint the trees as having been chopped down in 1021.

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u/responded Oct 20 '21

Yeah, but have they ever used knowledge of unusual solar activity to date the trees? We'll probably never know.

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u/stinking_badgers Oct 20 '21

If I understand correctly, the news here is not that there is proof of a settlement (that’s been agreed upon by archaeologists for some time) but that, thanks to specific testing of wood at the site, they have been able to zero in with surprising accuracy on what they believe to be the exact year.

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u/fiddlenutz Oct 20 '21 Silver Gold Starstruck

Viking Heritage Day. Rename it. Everyone celebrates with horns of mead and legs of meat.

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u/SteveFoerster Oct 20 '21

No need, as October 9 is already Leif Erikson Day, in honor of the first European to Columbus America.

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

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u/DMan304 Oct 20 '21 Silver Gold Vibing Rocket Like

Nah, Amon Amarth.

199

u/Narapoia Oct 20 '21

THOR ODINSSON PROTECTOR OF MANKIND. RISE TO MEET YOUR FATE. RAGNAROK AWAITS.

73

u/y2jeff Oct 20 '21

THERE GOES FENRIS' TWIN,

HIS JAWS ARE OPEN WIDE,

45

u/Winterfrost691 Oct 20 '21

THE SERPENT, RISES FROM THE WAVES

30

u/Mostadio Oct 20 '21

JORMUNGANDR TWISTS AND TURNS MIGHTY IN HIS WRATH, HIS EYES ARE FULL OF PRIMAL HATE

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u/NsRhea Oct 20 '21

Fafnir's Gold! A dragon's tale!

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u/dankdaimyo Oct 20 '21

380

u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

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196

u/JoePrey Oct 20 '21

Consent? What crazy idea is that!

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u/Keskiverto Oct 20 '21

Asking sounds very un-vikingr. How about looting?

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u/snorermadlysnored Oct 20 '21 Helpful

Vinland saga

55

u/kirsion Oct 20 '21

Season 2 farmland saga hype

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u/Who_ate_my_cookie Oct 20 '21

The most beautiful thing is that the show is historically accurate for the most part, I’m learning history while watching an anime

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u/andropogon09 Oct 20 '21

Don't need another holiday. We already have Tiwaz' Day, Woden's Day, Thor's Day, and Freyja's Day.

52

u/T0x1C-01m Oct 20 '21

"Its Woden's day my dudes."

"AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!"

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u/Bob_Sconce Oct 20 '21

Q: One of the reasons that the Spanish were so able to conquer indigenous people was disease brought with them for which native Americans had not developed any immunity. Those diseases spread faster than the Spanish did so that, in many places when they (and other Europeans) entered an area, many of the natives who formerly occupied the area had just been wiped out. Why didn't that happen with the Vikings about 500 years earlier?

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u/Cruxion Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

One of the biggest diseases passed on by the Spanish was smallpox, which the vikings would not have had at the time. Besides that, it's entirely possible they spread tons of diseases but we don't know because the natives didn't leave written records and the vikings may or may not have known about it since neither groups really integrated much in any way aside from trade.

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u/gd2234 Oct 20 '21

Uhh Vikings had smallpox and may have helped spread the world's deadliest virus “Scientists have discovered extinct strains of smallpox in the teeth of Viking skeletons -- proving for the first time that the killer disease plagued humanity for at least 1400 years.”

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u/Cruxion Oct 20 '21

Thanks, I guess what I'd heard was wrong or out of date.

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u/jsusywjwius2u2 Oct 20 '21

Archaeologist can get smalpox an die from dig up toof ? Wtf

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u/[deleted] Oct 20 '21

[deleted]

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u/NotQuiteGlennMiller Oct 21 '21

That reminds me of that episode of House where that family found a jar on a sunk slaver ship that had a disease going around on it.

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u/Thatguy3145296535 Oct 21 '21

This is also somewhat similar to all the Egyptian Mummy "curses". As an archaeologist way back in the day with no immunizations and exposing yourself to a 2000+ year old mummy who knows what diseases they had.

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u/PigSlam Oct 20 '21

The places where the Vikings landed were a lot colder than where the Spanish were. Perhaps that slowed/prevented the spread.

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u/_AlreadyTaken_ Oct 20 '21

And there was less interaction with the natives by the Vikings. The Spanish were side-by-side with them.

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u/How2Eat_That_Thing Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

If the Viking accounts are correct they have very little contact with natives. The island they inhabited had no natives living there and the few, were talking less than 10 people, they did meet were from a population that had very small bands and themselves were highly isolated. Had they been carrying anything like smallpox and transmitted it the natives who contracted it would have likely died before meeting up with other natives.

IIRC the account only mentions meeting 2 natives who we believe were Eskimos of some variety. Eskimos are different from other native groups in that we think they continued to have some contact with Old World groups which potentially meant they got the gene that allowed their bodies to combat OW diseases like smallpox(which we think developed ~12000yr...after the main migration from the OW)far better than other Native Americans. It's all pretty current research though so we can't really say with any certainty.

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u/Kozmog Oct 20 '21

Spanish had a more varied livestock, which harbor various poxes and influenza. Vikings did not.

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u/cloud_herder Oct 20 '21

When did we start using CE and not AD? I just realized this and now I’m worried I may have missed other big changes…

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u/notreally_bot2428 Oct 20 '21

I prefer to use "the Fourth age of Men"

37

u/shadmere Oct 20 '21

It is the dawn of the Third Age of Mankind.

12

u/sgtpnkks Oct 20 '21

Ten years after the Earth/Minbari War

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u/multiverse72 Oct 20 '21

Some use it. Some don’t. It’s up to the choice of the publication, university, author etc. You can use BC and AD just fine.

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u/Speckfresser Oct 20 '21

Piggybacking on your comment; the choice is yours to use the religious based BC and AD, or the 'non-religious' one BCE (before common/current era) and CE (you guessed it! Common/Current Era)

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u/bt123456789 Oct 20 '21

CE and BCE aren't tied to a religious thing like BC/AD so that's why some places use it, but as multiverse said, you can use BC/AD if you want to.

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u/garfgon Oct 20 '21

Always seemed rather thin since year 1 was still picked by a 6th century monk for religious reasons.

161

u/blizzardalert Oct 20 '21

I always like the idea of making the current year 12,021.

One, it starts the calendar around the neolithic revolution which is as good a start time as any. It's prehistory so it avoids the whole negative years and BC issue.

Two, it's a very easy change since it's backwards compatible to an extent. If someone mentions something in 1920 I know they mean 11,920, not 01,920.

Three, I think it helps promote long term thinking. Who cares about envormental damage in the year 3,000 if it's 2,000 now? But 13,000 and 12,000 seem a lot closer

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u/NoiceOne Oct 20 '21

I like this idea because the day it is put into place we instantly progress 10,000 years into the future thus confirming time travel is real.

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u/Ba_Dum_Ba_Dum Oct 20 '21

Ex-pat Newfoundlander here. Who fell in love with L’Anse aux Meadows when I visited for the first time in 2016.

The site is a UNESCO World Heritage site. No big deal. Every Newfoundlander learns that in grade 3. The reason was surprising to me though. The park tour guide told us it’s not explicitly because it’s the first European settlement in North America. But because it’s the place that has the oldest documented interactions between Europeans and native North Americans making it the oldest known site of global circumnavigation by humans! When she said that, the hair on the back of my neck stood up. It hadn’t even occurred to me. And it made the place so much more significant.

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u/ostracize Oct 21 '21 Silver

Yes! About 45,000 years ago, a group of humans in Central Asia split up. One group headed East and the other headed West.

Their descendants finally met each other in 1021 CE.

12

u/ReaverXai Oct 21 '21

"See, I told you this way was faster"

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u/lakeghost Oct 21 '21

Isn’t it amazing? My partner is 1/4th Maori and whenever I consider how the Pacific Islanders managed to travel so far on simple out-rigger canoes, it blows my mind again. I can’t even imagine. They think they got all the way to around the Galapagos now, going by genetic data. It took an amazing knowledge of natural phenomenon to accomplish these long oceanic voyages.

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u/11Kram Oct 20 '21

Yes, they got there, but they didn’t tell enough people to get any credit.

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u/timshel_life Oct 20 '21

They forgot to share their location on Snap Map

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u/----0000000------- Oct 20 '21 Silver

Dane here. Once I was in the US some American asked me if we in Scandinavia put the Vikings into Reservates like the Indians.

Never going back.

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u/scriggle-jigg Oct 20 '21

thats just hilarious to picture a viking reservation.

444

u/StandAgainstMarxism Oct 20 '21

Viking Casinos

261

u/jackp0t789 Oct 20 '21

"After you're done pillaging the slots, come raid our world-famous buffet!"

89

u/HyperIndian Oct 20 '21

"YOU SHALL FEAST WITH THE GODS"

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u/jackp0t789 Oct 20 '21

"TONIGHT YOULL BE DRINKING ALE FROM CUUUURVED HORNS!"

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u/Schlonzig Oct 20 '21

Double hilarious when you know that they were only called 'viking' while they were on tour.

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u/Qiviuq Oct 20 '21

"Fun" coincidence: we in Canada actually did put Icelandic immigrants, the descendants of Vikings, into a reservation in what is now Manitoba. Not quite "like the Indians" as the Icelanders were white and therefore had civil rights in ~1875.

28

u/kisukisi Oct 20 '21

ahh the Vesturfarar. We had a major volcanic eruption that caused a lot of people to seek new life in the west. Interestingly they settled in places that were similar to what they knew.

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u/Drakan47 Oct 20 '21

ok but... do you?

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u/gabio11 Oct 20 '21

Never heard of Greenland?

10

u/WoodAlcoholIsGreat Oct 20 '21

It's more Iceland that we used.

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u/TastiSqueeze Oct 20 '21 edited Oct 20 '21

The Meadows have been known since the 1960's. What is new is a precise date when the trees were cut down which is to say the least interesting.

Also, The Meadows may not be the only known site on the Atlantic seaboard. Point Rosee has been suggested as a viking site.

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u/KodeRed02 Oct 20 '21

AC Valhalla taught me this.

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u/PotentialHotTake Oct 20 '21

Wish there was more money involved in archaeology, it’s so cool.